All posts filed under: Opportunities

SONY DSC

Medical School: Applying as an International Applicant

By Huyen Nguyen To many American students, applying to medical schools is a tedious and endless process. Taking hard science courses, volunteering, shadowing, doing research and studying for the MCAT are the most fundamental things a typical applicant must do throughout their four years in college. People may think that earning a spot in medical schools cannot get any harder, but in fact, there are even higher standards and more complicated requirements which must be fulfilled by a special group of students: international applicants. My friend Ha Nguyen, a senior majoring in Genetics and Philosophy, is one of those. Ha came to the US by himself when he was only 13 years old. He knew nothing at the time, not even English. When his flight was delayed for three hours, he tried to get something to eat, picking Burger King because “burger” was the only word he understood. Ha then attended a military boarding high school in Texas, and after graduation, he came to UGA as he once joked, “because Athens’ food is way too good.” …

"Ekso Bionics" by Ekso Bionics is licensed under CC BY-ND 2.0

The Shepherd Center: Atlanta’s Most Valuable Resource

By Emma Burke To the casual passerby, the campus of concrete buildings situated on Peachtree Road appears to be just another metropolitan health care complex. However, the miracles performed every day at this catastrophic-care hospital are unique. Each year the Shepherd Center rehabilitates thousands of patients with traumatic brain and spinal cord injuries. Between inpatient, outpatient and day programs, the staff brings hope for a better life to people suffering from some of the most devastating ailments.

A Spotlight on Public Health at UGA

By Hammad Khalid and Trang Nguyen Whether as a practicing physician, medical researcher or hospital administrative worker, an understanding of public health practice is essential for success. The World Health Organization defines public health as “all organized measures to prevent disease, promote health and prolong life among the population as a whole.” Public health is an extremely broad field, with job prospects that may encompass health education, policy analysis or epidemiological research. Promotion of a healthier population, which is public health’s primary purpose, is quintessential to creating a sustainable healthcare system because it provides economic and social benefits from increased productivity. Furthermore, public health and medicine are essentially two sides of the same coin; both are crucial in creating a well-functioning system of successful healthcare delivery to the population and the individual. Within the University of Georgia, the College of Public Health offers programs at the undergraduate and graduate level that will prepare students to engage in the field of public health. At the undergraduate level, the College of Public Health offers a Bachelor of …

Photo credit: freeasinfreedom / Foter / CC BY-NC-ND

How Ancient Medicine Reveals Modern Medicine’s Change of Focus

By: Chiara Tondi Resta At the end of March, the UGA Classics department’s hard work finally culminated in the long-planned, two-day lecture event, “Ancient Medicine and the Modern Physician.” The event featured four separate lectures and was hosted by seven guest speakers, as well as faculty members from UGA. The topics dealt with ranged greatly, from “Practicing the Art of Medicine in the Ancient World” to “When Physicians err…” but the opening lecture I felt to be the most influential. “The Art of Medicine, It’s Always Been about Dialogue” did just that—it opened up an interesting, and certainly controversial, dialogue about how the focus of medicine has changed dramatically from ancient times to modern times. The conclusions reached at the lecture were critical to fixing some fundamental problems with modern medicine. The lecturer, Richard Panico, M.D., opened his presentation by describing just how poorly America ranks in health and healthcare. In fact, the U.S. is the worst ranked country in the world of those considered “high income” nations, even though we invest more money in …

Photo credit: midiman / Foter / CC BY

Bizarre Medical Careers

By: Linh Thanh Dinh It’s a no-brainer that most Pre-Med students aspire to become some type of physician (i.e. pediatrician), but they should reconsider after hearing about these bizarre medical occupations. A situation erupting on campuses across the country, including our very own University of Georgia, is that a growing number of aspiring doctors are choosing to major in the humanities or social sciences instead of the usual default, biology or chemistry. According to USA Today College, “Last year, nearly a quarter of medical school applicants majored outside the sciences, and for good reason: Nowadays, medical schools don’t care about what you majored in during your undergrad.” Of course, a tremendous amount of chemistry and biological sciences knowledge is required for your profession of choice, but it is possible to gain the impeccable communication skills and patience important for a healthy relationship with your career elsewhere. Have you ever heard of a clinical ethicist? Consider this unheralded position if you want to help shape and influence the way society deals with contentious medical issues. Issues …

Photo credit: Too Cool for School Art & Science Fair / Foter / CC BY-NC-ND

When Worlds Come Together

By: Chiara Tondi Resta Many undergraduate students concerned with their future careers choose to take a traditional “track,” such as pre-medicine, pre-law or pre-pharmacy. Although each of these disciplines is independent and has its own expectations for students, it is easy to get caught up in the tiny “bubble” of each track, and forget that in the real world, all of these professions overlap and often work together, even if they seemingly have nothing to do with each other. But in today’s world, this separation is becoming smaller each day, and it is important to not only realize this, but to embrace it with full force. For starters, students often tend to ignore their “opposing” classification of fields. For example, many science and math students avoid the humanities, and vice versa. And while this may not necessarily be true for medical schools, law schools are shooting this practice down, and rather aggressively hunting for pre-med and science students to pursue law. Why? Because the field of law is growing rapidly, and in this technology-ridden world, more …

Photo credit: DanieVDM / Foter / CC BY-NC-SA

Bizarre Medical Careers

By: Linh Thanh Dinh It’s a no-brainer that most Pre-Med students aspire to become some type of physician (i.e. pediatrician), but they should reconsider after hearing about these bizarre medical occupations. A situation erupting on campuses across the country, including our very own University of Georgia, is that a growing number of aspiring doctors are choosing to major in the humanities or social sciences instead of the usual default, biology or chemistry. According to USA Today College, “Last year, nearly a quarter of medical school applicants majored outside the sciences, and for good reason: Nowadays, medical schools don’t care about what you majored in during your undergrad.” Of course, a tremendous amount of chemistry and biological sciences knowledge is required for your profession of choice, but it is possible to gain the impeccable communication skills and patience important for a healthy relationship with your career elsewhere. Have you ever heard of a clinical ethicist? Consider this unheralded position if you want to help shape and influence the way society deals with contentious medical issues. Issues …

Image provided by Sefali Patel

An Experience like No Other

By: Sefali Patel, Guest Writer I never imagined all of the things I could do in a week in the far away South American country of Ecuador. Teaching young kids how to brush their teeth, working with dentists to fill the never-ending cavities, making an assembly-line to carry buckets of cement up the halfway made staircase in a village surrounded by a scenery of paradise…every moment was simply breathtaking. My experiences were made possible by MEDLIFE, an organization that promotes medicine, education and development in underserved populations across various parts of the world. Along with 23 other UGA students, I participated on a Mobile Clinic trip that set up temporary health clinics in various parts of Esmeraldas, Ecuador to provide basic health care services. Students worked with MEDLIFE personnel in setting up the tents and preparing the rooms for the stations that patients would visit. For example, a typical mother and child would first register and learn about preventing diseases via videos and pamphlets; afterwards, the child would go to the tooth brushing station to receive …